Integrity Forum Report Indicts Judiciary, Others

By Morrison O.G. Sayon

A recent report released by the National Integrity Barometer has branded the Judiciary as the most corrupt government institution in the country.

In the report it was observed that 38 percent agreed and 6.8 percent of respondents strongly agreed respectively that they sometimes offered to pay court personnel extra money or gifts or favors for cases taken to court, but 3.8 percent disagreed while 6.9 strongly disagreed.

According to the report, 37 percent agreed and 15 percent of respondents strongly agreed that they were often asked by judges or court personnel to pay extra money or gifts or do favors for cases taken to court.

The report added that 29 percent disagreed and 7 percent strongly disagreed.

Some of the respondents said they were sometimes or often asked by court personnel to pay money, gifts or favor for services.

The Report further added that survey conducted by the group observed that 38 percent agreed and 12 percent of respondents strongly agreed that school authorities sometimes asked them to pay extra money in order to register at public schools. But 30 percent disagreed and 12 percent of respondents strongly disagreed to such practice.

However, 34 percent and 9 percent of respondents agreed and strongly agreed respectively that they often paid extra money to school authorities compared to 38 percent and 10 percent of respondents with such attitude.

The data on sex for grades according to the Integrity report revealed that 24.6 percent of respondents agreed and 8.5 percent strongly agreed that teachers sometimes asked for sex in exchange for grades. In addition, 40 percent disagreed and 11.1 percent strongly disagreed with such practice. Moreover, 11.4 percent and 4.3 percent of respondents said that such practice is not applicable and undecided respectively. Considering the sources at corruption in the public education sector, 14.6 percent agreed and 2.7 percent strongly agreed that respondents sometimes advance sexual offers to teachers in exchange for grades.

Meanwhile, 49.6 percent of the respondents disagreed and 19.9 percent strongly disagreed that respondents sometimes advance sexual offers to teachers in exchange for grades.

However, 8.5 percent and 4.7 percent indicated not applicable and undecided respectively.

In terms of exchanging money for grades, the survey report observed that, 28.8 percent agreed and 13.4 percent strongly agreed that they sometimes gave money to teachers in exchange for grades.

However, 40.6 percent disagreed and 8.8 percent of respondents strongly disagreed to such practice. Yet, 7 percent and 2.2 percent of respondents indicated not applicable and undecided respectively.

On the issue of police, the report said 41 percent of respondents agreed and 22 percent strongly agreed that they were sometimes asked by police officers to pay extra money or do a favor for the services they received while 25 percent disagreed and 6 percent strongly agreed to such practice.

In addition, 40 percent agreed and 19 percent strongly agreed that they were often asked by police to pay extra money or do a favor for the services they received. However, 30 percent disagreed and 5 percent strongly disagreed that they were often asked by the police to pay extra money for services received.

The report further revealed that 34 percent agreed and 12 percent strongly agreed that they sometimes offered to pay extra for services received from immigration officers.

On the other hand, 28 percent disagreed and 6 percent strongly disagreed. Moreover, 31 percent agreed and 9 percent strongly agreed they were often asked by immigration officers to pay extra money or gifts or do favors for services rendered.

At the same time, the survey on the public health sector showed that 29 percent of respondents agreed that 11 percent strongly agreed that they sometimes paid extra or gave gifts or favor for services received at public health centers.

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